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There are many assets such as bank accounts, brokerage accounts, insurance policies, annuities and retirement funds that allow a beneficiary to be named on the account. In the event of the account owner’s death, those funds go directly to the person named, avoiding a lengthy probate waiting period. An article in the Wall Street Journal highlighted the importance of keeping accurate and up-to-date documentation of those who have been named as beneficiaries and the serious issues that can arise if beneficiaries are not updates.

 beneficiariesFor example, it is important to remember that despite who is designated in a will, it’s the person named as the beneficiary on the account, policy, etc., who will receive the funds. It’s all too common for people to forget the beneficiary they named on as beneficiary on accounts opened years ago. Your will may be written so that your entire estate is left to one person, but if someone different is named as beneficiary on your bank accounts,the beneficiary on the accounts will receive the funds, not the person named in your will.

Another common oversight people make is forgetting to update beneficiaries when an event such as a death, marriage, or divorce occurs. Financial experts point out that it’s important to choose a beneficiary when you roll over a 401k or an IRA to a new plan or to a Roth IRA because the person who you had previously designated does not automatically carry over to any new accounts.

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Posted on in Beneficiaries
There are several aspects of estate planning, and while independent research can help to begin the process, the most important first step is to hire an experienced estate-planning attorney. While determining what type of trust or will is best for you can be begun on your own, navigating the subtle differences between them is best done with the assistance of an attorney. Attorney Cynthia HutchinsThere are five different types of trusts that can be used when beginning estate planning, according to CNN Money Magazine. A trust, according to Fidelity.com, “is a fiduciary agreement that allows a third party, or trustee, to hold assets on behalf of a beneficiary or beneficiaries.” A trust specifies how you would like your assets to be passed on to the people who you have designated as beneficiaries, and differs from a will because it deals only with specific assets owned by the trust rather than an overall plan for your estate upon your death. The first type of trust, according to CNN Money Magazine, is a credit-shelter trust. This is also known as a family trust, in which you designate “an amount to the trust up to but not exceeding the estate-tax exemption.” The rest of your estate can then be passed to your spouse upon your death tax-free. Another type of trust is known as a generation-skipping trust, which “allows you to transfer a substantial amount of money tax-free to beneficiaries who are at least two generations your junior—typically your grandchildren.” The next type of trust, according to CNN Money Magazine, is a qualified personal residence trust, which “can remove the value of your home or vacation dwelling from your estate.” This type of trust is very useful if your home “is likely to appreciate in value.” Another type of trust is called an irrevocable life insurance trust. It can be helpful when your heirs need money quickly after you are gone, for example, to keep a family business running. The fifth type of trust is a qualified terminable interest property trust, which is particularly useful if “you are part of a family where there have been divorces, remarriages, and stepchildren.” Determining which type of trust is best for you is only one aspect of estate planning. When you are ready to begin planning for your family, the most important first step is to seek the counsel of a lawyer. Do not go through the planning process alone. Contact an experienced DuPage County estate-planning attorney today.

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Ray CharlesSeveral of late singer Ray Charles’ children have won their legal battle to reclaim the copyrights on 60 of the entertainer’s most famous songs. A lawsuit filed by the Ray Charles Foundation attempted to block his children’s’ right to ownership.

In 1976, a revision to the Copyright Act gave authors the ability to reclaim their works assigned to publishers after a certain period of time. However, works "made for hire" cannot be reclaimed. If an author is deceased, then the heirs of the estate are allowed to recover works.

In 2010, seven of Charles’ twelve children filed termination to reclaim ownership of the 60 compositions from Warner/Chappell Music. Warner/Chappell did not challenge the validity of the termination notices. The Ray Charles Foundation did, however, because it reaps royalties from the copyrighted music.

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