Tag Archives: children

Different Types of Trusts

There are several aspects of estate planning, and while independent research can help to begin the process, the most important first step is to hire an experienced estate-planning attorney. While determining what type of trust or will is best for you can be begun on your own, navigating the subtle differences between them is best done with the assistance of an attorney.

Attorney Cynthia HutchinsThere are five different types of trusts that can be used when beginning estate planning, according to CNN Money Magazine. A trust, according to Fidelity.com, “is a fiduciary agreement that allows a third party, or trustee, to hold assets on behalf of a beneficiary or beneficiaries.” A trust specifies how you would like your assets to be passed on to the people who you have designated as beneficiaries, and differs from a will because it deals only with specific assets owned by the trust rather than an overall plan for your estate upon your death.

The first type of trust, according to CNN Money Magazine, is a credit-shelter trust. This is also known as a family trust, in which you designate “an amount to the trust up to but not exceeding the estate-tax exemption.” The rest of your estate can then be passed to your spouse upon your death tax-free. Another type of trust is known as a generation-skipping trust, which “allows you to transfer a substantial amount of money tax-free to beneficiaries who are at least two generations your junior—typically your grandchildren.”

The next type of trust, according to CNN Money Magazine, is a qualified personal residence trust, which “can remove the value of your home or vacation dwelling from your estate.” This type of trust is very useful if your home “is likely to appreciate in value.” Another type of trust is called an irrevocable life insurance trust. It can be helpful when your heirs need money quickly after you are gone, for example, to keep a family business running. The fifth type of trust is a qualified terminable interest property trust, which is particularly useful if “you are part of a family where there have been divorces, remarriages, and stepchildren.”

Determining which type of trust is best for you is only one aspect of estate planning. When you are ready to begin planning for your family, the most important first step is to seek the counsel of a lawyer. Do not go through the planning process alone. Contact an experienced DuPage County estate-planning attorney today.

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Appointing a Guardian for Your Children

Estate planning is not just about deciding where your money will go. When planning for your family after your death, your assets are not the only things about which you will need to decide. Especially if your children are young, you will need to take into consideration what will happen for them upon your death. It may seem morbid to think about, but planning ahead is far less morbid than not having a plan—which leaves your family to make decisions without you. Naming a legal guardian in the event of your death, if your children are minors, is an important part of estate planningAppointing a Guardian for Your Children IMAGE

According to IllinoisLegalAid.org, a “guardian is a person who has been appointed by the court to handle the personal or financial affairs of another person.” Many parents opt to appoint a trusted relative or friend as the guardian of their children. It is important that the person who you prefer to have as your child’s guardian is trustworthy and close to the child—this person will be handling all the financial, as well as day-to-day, decisions in your child’s life if you are unable to do so. If your child is developmentally disabled and relies solely on you, even if your child is over 18 you will need to consider naming a legal guardian. According to IllinoisLegalAid.org, “many important decisions may need to be made concerning matters such as health care, living arrangements, and habilitation.”

According to CNN Money Magazine, “if you die without a will—a status known as intestate—you leave it up to the court to decide who will take care of your child.” First-time, young parents often name their own parents as guardians of their children, which can be a good decision at an early age, but given the fact that grandparents usually die before their children this may need to be amended at some point thereafter.

If you or someone you know is beginning estate planning, do not go through it alone. Contact a dedicated Illinois estate-planning attorney today.

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Ray Charles’ Children Win Legal Battle to Reclaim Song Copyrights

Ray CharlesSeveral of late singer Ray Charles’ children have won their legal battle to reclaim the copyrights on 60 of the entertainer’s most famous songs. A lawsuit filed by the Ray Charles Foundation attempted to block his children’s’ right to ownership.

In 1976, a revision to the Copyright Act gave authors the ability to reclaim their works assigned to publishers after a certain period of time. However, works “made for hire” cannot be reclaimed. If an author is deceased, then the heirs of the estate are allowed to recover works.

In 2010, seven of Charles’ twelve children filed termination to reclaim ownership of the 60 compositions from Warner/Chappell Music. Warner/Chappell did not challenge the validity of the termination notices. The Ray Charles Foundation did, however, because it reaps royalties from the copyrighted music.

According to a report in Variety, the judge would not rule on whether or not the songs were “made for hire” but instead wrote that “because the foundation is not a grantee of the rights to be terminated or its successor, Congress did not even require the statutory heirs provide it with statutory notice of the termination, let alone give it a seat at the table during the termination process.”

The foundation was also claiming breach of contract, claiming that in 2002, the children entered into an agreement with their father under which he set up a $500,000 trust for each of them and they waived “any right to make a claim against his estate.” The judge ruled that the termination notices were not claims against the estate because the estate had been probated and closed in 2006, prior to the notices being sent out. Therefore, there was no breach of contract.

Foundations, trusts, and any other estate planning issues can be very complicated and through knowledge of the law is important. Make sure you consult with a qualified Illinois estate attorney for all your estate planning needs.