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charitable trust IMAGEWith taxpayers owing such a high percentage of taxes on almost any type of long-term gain, in addition to other taxes –such as the Medicare surtax – those in the top tax brackets might consider establishing charitable remainder trusts for donations of highly-appreciated assets. A charitable trust is a trust established for some charitable purpose. Charitable trusts are limited in what they can do; they must fit into a certain category established by the law.

 Setting up a Charitable Trust

In order to establish a charitable trust, you must first create the trust and donate the property to the trust that will eventually pass to a charity that is approved by the IRS. The trustee will manage or invest the property to produce an income. A charitable trust can pay the person who established the trust a certain percentage of the income that was made from the trust over an agreed upon payment timeline.  After the person that established the trust passes away, the charity becomes the owner of the property.

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 adverse possession IMAGEA recent Hollywood-like story out of Munich is setting the stage for some interesting issues regarding estate planning and the rights of heirs. In a raid on the home of Cornelius Gurlitt in Germany, the police found over 1,000 paintings, drawings, and other works of art packed alongside hoarded groceries.  Among the art discovered were works by Beckman, Picasso, Matisse, and Renoir – all taken from Jewish collectors in Nazi Germany.  According to an article from the Chicago Tribune, the art stashed away in Gurlitt’s house could be worth over $1 billion.  The Nazi Regime and “Degenerate Art” The art found in Gurlitt’s home was previously possessed by Gurlitt’s father, who helped Adolf Hitler sell art that had been stolen or quickly sold off by Jewish collectors throughout Europe. The Nazis categorized many great works of art as ‘degenerate’ and sold them on the open art market to provide additional wartime funding. Despite human rights organizations and Jewish groups around the world calling on Gurlitt to unconditionally return the art to their rightful owners, the German newspaper Der Spiegel reported that he has no plans of returning the artwork to those who owned the pieces sixty years ago.  Instead, Gurlitt said, he plans on spending his life with the paintings. Legal Issues How is it that Gurlitt is allowed to keep art stolen by Nazis?  Due to the sheer enormity of the find by German police officers, there is no legal precedent for what to do with all of the art. While many believe that the art should simply be returned to those who lost it during World War II, the solution is not that simple.  First, a statute of limitations may exist barring collectors who lost their work from making claims against Gurlitt.  A statute of limitations is a legally prescribed time limit in which a lawsuit may be filed in court.  Second, some are already claiming that Gurlitt owns the art through adverse possession.  Adverse possession is a way in which someone else may acquire ownership of property so long as a number of requirements are met, including ‘openly’ using the property so that the true owner is put on notice. While in the U.S. the doctrine of adverse possession primarily applies to real estate, in Germany it can apply to art as well.  Hence, even if someone who lived under Nazi rule could show that they had lost their property to Hitler’s regime, after decades of the art being in someone else’s possession, any claims for restitution may be barred.

Sometimes the law regarding property ownership and the rights of heirs can be complicated, even nonsensical.  It is therefore important that you make sure all of your assets are accounted for and your estate is planned.  If you have any questions regarding your estate, contact an experienced Illinois estate planning attorney today.

There are many assets such as bank accounts, brokerage accounts, insurance policies, annuities and retirement funds that allow a beneficiary to be named on the account. In the event of the account owner’s death, those funds go directly to the person named, avoiding a lengthy probate waiting period. An article in the Wall Street Journal highlighted the importance of keeping accurate and up-to-date documentation of those who have been named as beneficiaries and the serious issues that can arise if beneficiaries are not updates.

 beneficiariesFor example, it is important to remember that despite who is designated in a will, it’s the person named as the beneficiary on the account, policy, etc., who will receive the funds. It’s all too common for people to forget the beneficiary they named on as beneficiary on accounts opened years ago. Your will may be written so that your entire estate is left to one person, but if someone different is named as beneficiary on your bank accounts,the beneficiary on the accounts will receive the funds, not the person named in your will.

Another common oversight people make is forgetting to update beneficiaries when an event such as a death, marriage, or divorce occurs. Financial experts point out that it’s important to choose a beneficiary when you roll over a 401k or an IRA to a new plan or to a Roth IRA because the person who you had previously designated does not automatically carry over to any new accounts.

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A good estate plan includes a will. Wills are an efficient way to distribute property according to the person’s intent and avoid family fighting at the time of distribution. Wills have been around for a long time, and are part of the tool set of every experienced estate-planning attorney. A common, but serious mistake that people make is to use generic wills that they find online. Wills found online are problematic because they may not comply with the Illinois Wills statute and may leave gaps in the property distribution.

RigsAn experienced Illinois estate-planning attorney on the other hand, will have a personal relationship with her clients and ensure that wills reflect the nuances of each individual case. After drafting the will, the attorney will guide the client through the process of reviewing, revising, and executing the will.

An experienced Illinois estate-planning attorney will make sure that will execution process meets the requirements of the Illinois statute governing wills. First, the person executing the will must be at least 18 years old and must be of sound mind. The issue of sound mind is problematic when elderly people execute or amend wills, because unless done properly, these wills are open to challenges based on allegations of unsound mind.

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Planning for pet care after one dies is an area of estate planning that people often overlook. Sometimes, a family member will step up to take care of the pet. However, when family members are not willing or able to take on the responsibility of caring for a pet, the pet could end up in a shelter.

Discuss pet care with your estate planning lawyer.[/caption]

Fortunately, an estate-planning attorney will make sure that a strong estate plan contains adequate resources to provide for the pet. In Illinois, one can go about providing for a pet in two ways. However, both methods are not equal.

The first option is for the pet owner to make a bequest in a will to a family member providing resources to take care of the pet. While this method is easy because the bequest is usually part of the main will, it may not be in the best interest of the pet. Illinois wills usually have to go through probate, which can mean long delays before the funds are available for the pet care. Moreover, wills are open to challenges during probate, which may mean even longer delays.

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